Ugh, sports.

I found out yet another favorite athlete is out with injury. Let’s call them the big three because in my fandom Derrick Rose (ACL), Hope Solo (wrist ligaments/cartilage), and Lindsey Vonn (knee blowout too extensive to recount) are my big three. All out.

This time it’s Hope Solo with ligament damage in her wrist she has to have surgery on. It’s an injury she’s had since 2010 but hasn’t had a break in the WC/Olympic schedule to get it fixed. She’s just been playing through the pain and between it flaring up worse and a slight window to get the operation done the medical staff green lit it. So now she’ll miss the Algarve Cup (third most important tournament which is finally available PPV), friendlies against Germany (ugh), and the Netherlands (whatever I guess), and the pre-season for Seattle Reign which is taking place in Japan (double ugh squared), and possibly the first part of the NWSL season too.

I’m going to a Reign game in Chicago in August and she should be ok by then. The Reign might have a terrible record by that point due to numerous setbacks beyond the Hope thing, but whatever. I’ll be there anyway. They are still the prettiest team.

Tuesday Trio

I tried this out a couple weeks ago. Here we go again! I always like getting recs for books or movies especially if there are little threads like ‘hey, you’d like this because this character reminds me of such in such’ or ‘this feels like a progenitor to that.’ Here’s this week’s Tuesday Trio!

In this trio we have a lot of connections. First off all three involve deteriorated, moldy old cities of similar advancement the second two with canal like cultures, and all with very distinct upper and lower classes. They also have protege situations where characters have to learn to exist in the opposite lifestyles than they were accustomed. Street rat in the upper class. Upper class person forced to sort out life on the street. Weeks’ series could almost be read as a side story to Cherryh’s. The universes are so similar. In Pratchett’s Discworld series, there is a character named Carrot who is so very much like Logan in The Way of Shadows. If you like any one of these books I’m sure you’d like the other two. Check them out!

Night Watch, by Terry Pratchett (Amazon/B&N)
One moment, Sir Sam Vimes is in his old patrolman form, chasing a sweet-talking psychopath across the rooftops of Ankh-Morpork. The next, he’s lying naked in the street, having been sent back thirty years courtesy of a group of time-manipulating monks who won’t leave well enough alone. This Discworld is a darker place that Vimes remembers too well, three decades before his title, fortune, beloved wife, and impending first child. Worse still, the murderer he’s pursuing has been transported back also. Worst of all, it’s the eve of a fabled street rebellion that needlessly destroyed more than a few good (and not so good) men. Sam Vimes knows his duty, and by changing history he might just save some worthwhile necks—though it could cost him his own personal future. Plus there’s a chance to steer a novice watchman straight and teach him a valuable thing or three about policing, an impressionable young copper named Sam Vimes. (via Amazon)

The Way of Shadows, by Brent Weeks (Amazon/B&N)
For Durzo Blint, assassination is an art-and he is the city’s most accomplished artist. For Azoth, survival is precarious. Something you never take for granted. As a guild rat, he’s grown up in the slums, and learned to judge people quickly – and to take risks. Risks like apprenticing himself to Durzo Blint. But to be accepted, Azoth must turn his back on his old life and embrace a new identity and name. As Kylar Stern, he must learn to navigate the assassins’ world of dangerous politics and strange magics – and cultivate a flair for death. (via Amazon)

Angel with the Sword, by C.J. Cherryh (Amazon/B&N)
In Merovingen, a watery canal-laced city, much like Earth’s Venice, society is segregated along class lines between the lower and upper cities. Against her better judgment, Altair Jones, 17, rescues an unconscious man from a canal near her poleboat. She is fascinated by Mondragon’s good looks and elegant ways and begins to fall in love with him. Even though she knows there is no future for a water rat like herself with such a man, she decides to watch over him and rescue him from his enemies; enemies who turn out to be the most powerful people in the upper city. (via Amazon)

Spent Time Downtown

Bento

I spent an afternoon in downtown Austin with my sister. She was shopping at some hipster eye glasses store and during the afternoon we also went to Snap Kitchen and Book People.

Snap Kitchen is like an American bento shop. All the food is prepared in little boxes and refrigerated, not frozen, fresh that day. It is marketed to people looking to lose weight and keep sensible portions, but it is also nice for people like me who have celiac and have to watch what I eat. AKA: no gluten, no dairy and no corn either. Corn in particular is packed into many things it doesn’t need to be in. These ingredients are simple, pronounceable, and more importantly — clearly marked. Amen.

I bought the Ginger Glazed Chicken that came with green beans, mashed squash, and a sliver of ginger on top, some green curry for the next day, and a salad with cilantro and lime dressing. All gluten free. All dairy free. No corn because corn doesn’t need to be filler in everything.

Stall

I took this picture in the first stall of the women’s bathroom in Book People. I think it speaks for itself.

glasses

Need some hipster plastic frames? Go to Eclectic Eyewear. Prepare to be parted from your money.

Enough

I finally finished Enough: Finding More by Living with Less. It’s a nice book if you are looking to escape the rat race of Western culture and wealth and put money in the correct perspective. It was an interesting read since I am coming from the perspective of growing up poor, moving a lot, and not really comfortable with having more possessions than what could fit into one truck. Then again I’m a saver and paranoid about ending up living on the edge. I suppose a book written from that angle would have been more profound for me at least, but this one wasn’t necessarily bad.